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Special events are presented by the Frances Lehman Loeb Art Center at Vassar in April.

POUGHKEEPSIE, NY--The Frances Lehman Loeb Art Center's special programs continue in April with special "Late Night at the Lehman Loeb" programming as well as the popular series, "Notes on Art: Noontime Concerts at the Art Center."

“We’ve been thrilled with the response to our Late Night and other special events that we've received from both the Vassar and Hudson Valley community,” said James Mundy, the Anne Hendricks Bass Director of the museum. “These extended hours and special programming have given very busy people a chance to appreciate all that the Art Center normally has to offer during the week, both at noon and after their working day.”

“Late Night at the Lehman Loeb,” is a popular series that has extended the public hours of the Art Center, so the galleries are now open every Thursday evening until 9:00pm. The Poughkeepsie Journal cited the Art Center as the “most accessible museum for 9-to-5ers.” Every “Late Night” program offers unique entertainment, including music, docent tours, performances, and refreshments, in addition to the chance to view the collection and exhibitions in a relaxed setting.

In conjunction with Late Night at the Lehman Loeb, on Thursday, April 8, Rabbi Gedaliah Druin, a Master Torah Scribe, educator and restoration expert will present an in-depth lecture on the ancient form of calligraphy used not only as a script but in art and mathematics. The program will begin at 6:00pm in Taylor Hall, room 102.  "The Art of Ancient Tribal Calligraphy," will also highlight the magic wonder of 13th century Kabbalistic letters and their origin 3,000 years ago. This project is hosted by Vassar Temple and made possible by a grant provided by the Dutchess County Arts Council, administrator of public funds through NYSCA’s Decentralization Program.

The popular noontime concert series, “Notes on Art” will commence on Tuesday, April 6, and continue weekly through April 27. These free concerts held in the galleries of the Art Center will present student  performers from the Department of Music at Vassar. Last year, this program was instituted by Nicole Roylance, coordinator of public education and information at the Art Center, and was a highly popular mid-day event.

The first week, on April 6, pianists and Vassar seniors Jeremy Shiman '10 and Brian Kim '10, will perform works by Schubert, Chopin and Liszt. Two works will be performed  on April 13: Felix Mendelssohn's  Piano Trio No. 1 in D Minor with Laura Sousa '10, cellist Janice Chang '11, and pianist Brian Kim '10 and Felix Aram Khachaturian's Trio for Clarinet, Violin and Piano with clarinetist Alexander Linsalata ’10, violinist Sarah Goldfeather ’10, and pianist Tiffany Shi ’12. Antonin Dvorak's String Quartet in F Major Op. 96 (American) will be featured on April 20, with violinists Laura Souza ’10 and Sophie Blum ’10, violist Emily Bookwalter ’10, and cellist Janice Hwang ’11. The final performance on April 27 will be of Beethoven's Septet in E Flat Major, Op. 20, with clarinetist Andrea Sisco ’12, bassoonist Franklin Guenthner ’10, hornist Daniel Files ’11, violinist  Sophie Blum ’10, violist  Serena Wong ’11, cellist Joseph Wheeler ’13, and bassist Alaric Chin ’13.

For up-to-date information on specific “Late Night at the Lehman Loeb” programs as well as the schedule of performers for “Notes on Art,” please check the Art Center website at http://fllac.vassar.edu. Late Night at the Lehman Loeb is made possible by the generous support of the Jane W. Nuhn Charitable Trust. All events are open to the public without charge.

About the Frances Lehman Loeb Art Center


The Frances Lehman Loeb Art Center was founded in 1864 as the Vassar College Art Gallery. The current 36,400-square-foot facility, designed by Cesar Pelli and named in honor of the new building's primary donor, opened in 1993. The Art Center's collections chart the history of art from antiquity to the present and comprise over 18,000 works, including paintings, sculptures, drawings, prints, photographs, and glass and ceramic wares. Notable holdings include the Warburg Collection of Old Master prints, an important group of Hudson River School paintings given by Matthew Vassar at the college's inception, and a wide range of works by major European and American 20th- century painters. Vassar was the first U.S. college founded with a permanent art collection and gallery, and at any given time, the Permanent Collection Galleries of the Art Center feature approximately 350 works from Vassar's extensive collections.

Admission to the Frances Lehman Loeb Art Center is free. The art center is open to the public Tuesday, Wednesday, Friday, Saturday, 10:00am–5:00pm; Thursday, 10:00am–9:00pm; and Sunday, 1:00–5:00pm. Located at the entrance to the historic Vassar College campus, the Art Center can be reached within minutes from other Mid-Hudson cultural attractions, such as Dia:Beacon, the Franklin Roosevelt and Eleanor Roosevelt national historic sites and homes, and the Vanderbilt mansion. The Art Center is wheelchair accessible. Please note that the Art Center will be temporarily closed for roof repairs from May 18, 2010, through January 2011. For additional information, the public may call (845) 437-5632 or visit http://fllac.vassar.edu.

Vassar College is a highly selective, coeducational, independent, residential liberal arts college founded in 1861.

Posted by Office of Communications Thursday, April 1, 2010